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You may not be surprised to learn that the PCMCIA card (actually CardBus) is an IDE adapter.

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Unfortunately, that’s all I have. The drive, as far as I can tell, still works fine, and the PCMCIA card would be very difficult to disassemble nondestructively, so I’ll update this thread when I’ve stuck it in my machine with information about what the computer sees it as.

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What else? There’s another 27LV520 EPROM, and what looks like a Texas Instruments L393, which may be a dual comparator IC.
Finally, we have the motor for the actual drive, made by Nidec.

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We’ve got the actual drive controller, an Iomega Boreas IC. Unfortunately, since this is an Iomega IC in an Iomega product, I predictably found no information about it.

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The 34H3306 doesn’t come up on google at all, but if I had to guess, it’s the companion “write channel” or something similar. Not super interesting.
So what else is on this board?

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So what’s under that sticker? We have two ICs, both Texas Instruments. One, a 34P3410-DCA, and the other, a 34H3306 B.
The 34P3410-DCA seems to be what handles part of the read interface; the datasheet states that it’s an 11.25-60Mbit/s read channel.

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So what’s the more interesting unit, the Clik! drive itself?
Iomega named this board the “D3 ORION5”. Wacky.

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On this board, we have a Xilinx XC95108 CPLD and an IC I couldn’t identify, labelled “846 1302”
Note: I checked under the other end of the sticker, it’s just more power regulation.
Bonus: the underside has these spring contacts for the battery that I unfortunately don’t have.

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Let’s move on! The drive itself is ripe for the disassembling. First, we have the actual interface board for the Clik! drive, labelled “D3 I/O”. This has the Clik! Drive port, as well as a bunch of power regulation, and..something. What’s under that sticker?

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I was hoping for something that said “IDE interface”, but no dice. Iomega seems to have implemented the interface in an FPGA, with a separate microcontroller for the screen and button, I suppose to ensure the user interface and the storage interface didn’t impact each other.

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At the bottom, we’ve got another media card port, and on the underside, it has an Actel A42MX09 FPGA, a Philips P80C32SBBB 8-bit 8051-based microcontroller, a CY2071 clock generator, a 27LV520 EPROM, a CC384 negative voltage regulator, and an IS62LV1024LL-70T static RAM IC

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In the middle is this board, marked “D3 FCR - MID”
It has no active components, but bears the socket that connects to the drive itself, as well as one of the media card ports.

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So let’s have a look. On the top, we have the display PCB. It looks to have been manufactured somewhere else, bears the Sharp logo, and my guess is they manufactured it for Iomega (going by how there’s no information on the markings online)
The IC on the back is an LCD driver.

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Interesting. There’s nothing on the underside of the PCB, so let’s move on. How about the memory card to Clik! media transfer gizmo?

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Inside, it’s not much more exciting. A rats nest of wiring, a bunch of passive components, a 3MHz crystal, and what’s obviously the parallel port interface, a datastor EP-2000. But what is it?
A quick google revealed it as an IDE to Parallel interface.

This drive uses IDE?

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So this is a fairly unassuming little thing, not very heavy, it has a parallel port interface for plugging something else into it (like a printer), and it has a cable to plug into your computer’s port.

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So what’s inside? Let’s start with the parallel port interface, because it uses philips head screws and it took me a little while to find any other screwdriver heads.

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Unfortunately, this didn’t happen, but god we can dream.
As you may have seen on an LGR video (youtu.be/r4hQeWtkTC8), Iomega also produced a camera kit (the Clik! Drive Plus). A Clik! drive with a media card interface, PCMCIA card adapter and parallel port interface.

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Iomega was really hopeful that this would take off as a, well, pocketable media format. So much so, that they released the Iomega HipZip MP3 player (which ran a small real-time operating system developed partly by RedHat!)

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